Lucy Popescu

freedom to write, review, travel…

Posts Tagged ‘Syrian refugees’

Book Review – A HOPE MORE POWERFUL THAN THE SEA

Posted by lucypopescu on July 15, 2017

Asylum seekers continue to be stigmatized in the media, so it is refreshing to see more books being published that give refugees a voice. We need to change the negative propaganda surrounding those forced to flee war, poverty or intolerance. A Hope More Powerful than the Sea poignantly illuminates some of the reasons why our fellow humans embark on such perilous journeys to reach Europe.

Melissa Fleming, the Chief Spokesperson for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, brings to life the harrowing tale of Doaa Al Zamel, a Syrian refugee. In clear, accessible prose, Fleming chronicles Doaa’s happy childhood in Syria, the early months of the uprising, and the brutal crackdown that ensued. When life in the midst of a war zone becomes intolerable, Doaa and her family seek refuge in Egypt.

They are initially welcomed and cared for by local Egyptians, but after President Mohamed Morsi is deposed, resentment towards the refugees grows and Doaa finds herself regularly abused by men on the street. Her fiancé, Bassem, also suffers from an increased hostility towards Syrian refugees. In poor health and unable to bear “a life of limbo in a country where its own citizens were facing a sinking economy, high inflation, and rising food prices”, Doaa finally agrees to accompany Bassem on a treacherous journey across the Mediterranean.

Before they reach Greece, their rusty fishing boat is deliberately rammed by a group of mindless racists. Doaa’s boat capsizes and those on board are flung into the water. Most drown instantly, some die an agonizing death as they are hacked to pieces by the boat’s propellers. Witnessing it all, Doaa keeps afloat with the help of a children’s inflatable ring for four days and nights. She clings on to two baby girls until her rescue, persevering for their sake.

A particularly chilling moment is Doaa’s realization that those onboard had been sold fake life jackets and inadequate flotation aids. Many of Doaa’s group, including her beloved Bassem, die because of this. Out of 500 people, only eleven survive the catastrophe.

One can only hope that by sharing Doaa’s story, her remarkable courage, Fleming will help people better understand why so many are prepared to risk so much in order to reach relative safety.

Originally published by the TLS

 

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Film Review – Lost in Lebanon

Posted by lucypopescu on May 28, 2017

 

This heart breaking film  by Sophia and Georgia Scott follows four Syrian refugees as they struggle to rebuild their lives in Lebanon. Syria’s neighbour has had to cope with a massive influx of refugees – Lebanon’s population is 4.4 million and 1.5 million Syrians have flooded into the country since the beginning of the conflict. Lost in Lebanon was shot in Beirut and on the Syrian border between 2014 and 2016. During this time, Lebanon was forced to restrict its open door policy for Syrian refugees and imposed various visa restrictions aimed at discouraging Syrians from entering or staying. As the film makes clear, the result has been devastating for many refugees who have nowhere else to go and fear for their lives if they are forcibly returned to Syria.

Sheikh Abdo manages a refugee camp just five kilometres from the Syrian border. Abdo takes his responsibilities seriously and works tirelessly for his fellow refugees. Nemr is a 19-year-old high-school student who fled forced military recruitment: “My destiny would have been to become a killer or a victim.” He volunteers in the camp’s school but dreams of a better future. Reem is a former architect who now helps in the Shatila refugee camp in Beirut. As a refugee she is not supposed to work but spends her time trying to help those worse off than herself. Mwafak is a 26-year-old artist, also based in Beirut. Mwafak never stops giggling, but then we realise his humour is a defence mechanism, a means of survival, he is laughing at his own plight. He is proud; not wanting to be labelled a refugee he refuses to register with the UNRHC until he is forced to. Mwafak is driven by his imagination, his need to create art, and his talent. He also volunteers, teaching art to children in another refugee camp.

All four show similar commitment to the health and education of Syrian children, however rudimentary. They recognise the importance of educating the next generation and that their homeland will need to be rebuilt with love and creativity rather than hate and violence. They exhibit extraordinary resilience in the face of unimaginable hardship but the relentless fear of deportation impacts on them all with devastating consequences. Both Nemr and Mwafak consider attempting the perilous journey by sea. Nemr ponders why anyone would want to risk their lives and concludes “they’re willing to drown just to live as humans.” Lost in Lebanon contains many such shocking soundbites. At a meeting organised by Reem, one man remarks on the hell they find themselves in: “We can’t go back to Syria, we can’t renew our residency, we can’t leave by boat. Why don’t they just exterminate us and be done with it.”

If you have ever wondered what life is like for a refugee then see this film. No one should have to endure this degree of psychological torture and the West needs to demonstrate compassion rather than prejudice or indifference. Sophia Scott’s beautiful cinematography opens in a long dark tunnel with blinding light at the end and the joyous sound of children playing, calling out the name of their homeland; it ends in the same tunnel but the camera is travelling in the opposite direction with the light receding. Birds also feature; just as they are free to travel over land and sea, refugees are not. The refusal of these men, women and children to give up offers a ray of hope. A remarkable and humane film that never strikes a false note.

Originally published by Cine-vue.com

 

 

 

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