Lucy Popescu

freedom to write, review, travel…

Book Review – Threads: From the refugee crisis

Posted by lucypopescu on June 25, 2017

 

Calais was once famous for the art of lace-making; now it is better known for the groups of desperate refugees who gather in its port hoping to cross into Britain. In early 2016 the cartoonist and activist Kate Evans (who is also the author of Red Rosa: A graphic biography of Rosa Luxemburg, 2015) volunteered for a brief stint in the refugee camp known as the Jungle. Her new graphic novel Threads depicts the shantytown before it was demolished later that year. A ribbon of lace frames each page, the delicate threads standing in sharp contrast to the refugees’ harsh existence.

Instead of finding sanctuary in Europe, they live in limbo. Evans’s subjects are shunted between camps in Calais and Dunkirk, and she meticulously documents their helplessness, along with their remarkable endurance. Her eyewitness reportage is punctuated with news headlines about the various atrocities fuelling the refugee crisis – the Russian fighter planes bombing Syria and US forces bombing the Médecins Sans Frontières hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, for example. Evans also captures in separate cartoons the political prejudice of Theresa May, Britain’s then Home Secretary, claiming that there is no economic benefit to migration, and France’s Marine Le Pen encouraging distrust of Muslims as she addresses a rally in Calais.

The squalor of the Jungle is evident in Evans’s illustrations. Only twenty-four toilets are provided for 5,000 people, and the water tests positive for faecal contamination. The diversity of the inhabitants is represented by the ramshackle colourfulness of her sketches of them. Attempts to help the refugees, some of whom are unaccompanied children as young as seven, can be chaotic: Evans depicts aid workers trying to distribute children’s clothes, overwhelmed by lines of desperate men. Swimming goggles are dis carded as impractical and, too late, it is recognized that they would have provided a useful defence against tear gas. Evans is quick to note the Kafkaesque decisions of the authorities – on two separate occasions, refugees and aid workers are prevented from bringing fresh bread or dry bedding into the camp.

Evans also shares the pejorative texts she has received condemning her voluntary work. When one text message claims, “These refugees are safe in France where they could claim asylum if they wanted 2 shame they want our benefits too much!”, she responds with a series of stark illustrations (leached of colour, the frames increased in size) showing three refugee men being brutally beaten by unidentified assailants. One victim later remarks, “they were wearing blue suits. Like the ones that the police wear, but with the emblems torn off”.

Police brutality is seen as shamelessly open. Evans’s illustrations convey the terrifying spectacle of rows of riot police and bulldozers, and the fear of the Jungle’s inhabitants as they are tear-gassed. The author learns of one fifteen-year-old boy whose skull has been fractured, and a pregnant woman who has been slapped by police. Again and again, her narrative emphasizes the desperation of people trying to reach safety, and she includes some haunting snapshots explaining why they have fled their native countries, ranging from torture and rape to sustained persecution for being gay. The appalling threads of these people’s lives coalesce to form a bigger picture with an underlying message: we need to treat our fellow humans with care and respect, for inhumanity breeds inhumanity.

A mother herself, Kate Evans depicts her young subjects with remarkable tenderness. We’re not told about a child’s boredom, fear or meltdown – we see it. Their lives are on hold and many are battling despair. Back in Britain, the author depicts herself watching the demolition of the Jungle on her phone and remarks: “It’s more than some people’s homes that are being destroyed. It’s their minds”. Her book ends on a chilling note: after the eviction, 129 lone children disappeared from the camps. As Threads makes clear, one child is too many; 129 is a humanitarian catastrophe.

Originally published by the TLS

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Theatre Review – The Ugly One

Posted by lucypopescu on June 18, 2017

The Ugly One Park Theatre90

Marius von Mayenburg’s blistering satire about vanity and the dangers of a conformist society, written a decade before selfies, Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat became a way of life, is remarkably prescient.

Lette (Charlie Dorfman) cannot understand why his assistant Karlmann (Arian Nik) is being sent abroad in his stead to promote his latest invention – an electrical plug. He is alarmed to learn that he is apparently so ugly that his boss (T’Nia Miller) won’t let him present his own work.

When his wife Fanny (Indra Ove) admits that it’s true and she can’t look him in the face, Lette employs a surgeon (Miller) to restructure his features. Suddenly he becomes irresistible to Fanny and a sexual magnet for men and women alike. He is in demand at work and by the surgeon who uses him to advertise his skills.

All too soon, however, Lette lookalikes begin to proliferate. His face and fame have become a curse and he suffers an identity crisis.

Von Mayenburg warns against prizing physical perfection over intelligence and his play retains its resonance. More than ever, people are stigmatised for being different, for not conforming to current fashions and tastes.

Roy Alexander Weise, winner of the 2016 James Menzies-Kitchin Award, directs with panache. The four-strong cast give it their all, although with a tendency to play for quick laughs.

There are echoes of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Ira Levin’s The Stepford Wives, Edward Albee’s black humour and, in the play’s final moments, one cannot help but be reminded of President Trump’s rampant narcissism.

Park Theatre90

Running until 24 June

Originally published by Camden New Journal

 

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Book Review – The Book of Mirrors

Posted by lucypopescu on June 18, 2017

E. O. Chirovici’s psychological thriller almost did not see the light of day. It was turned down by numerous publishers and it was only on the advice of Robert Peett, the founder of Holland House Books, that Chirovici persisted. He was eventually signed by a leading UK literary agent and has since enjoyed a competitive auction and world-wide rights sales.

The Book of Mirrors is narrated from the different perspectives of three men and focuses on the brutal murder of the renowned psychologist Professor Joseph Weider in 1987. Twenty seven years later, Richard Flynn, a former student at Princeton, sends a book proposal to a literary agent, Peter Katz, which describes the professor’s final days. Flynn was a prime suspect at the time, but no-one was ever tried for Weider’s murder and the case went cold. Katz believes Flynn’s manuscript contains a confession or holds clues to the murderer’s identity. Either way, he thinks it’s a potential blockbuster, but Flynn dies before delivering his novel. Katz hires John Keller, an investigative journalist, to pull the threads together. Keller fails to ascertain who is telling the truth and, increasingly disillusioned, passes on his findings to the detective originally
responsible for the case who is now retired and suffering from the early stages of Alzheimer’s.

Does The Book of Mirrors deserve the hype? Yes and no. Impressively, Chirovici writes in English rather than his native Romanian and he has produced a strong plot which keeps the reader guessing until the very end. His three narrators, however, are sketchily drawn and the motivations of crucial characters lack psychological
depth. This is disappointing considering the book’s central theme is the cognitive neuroscience of memory.

Although there is a meta-fictional quality to the novel, the literary quotes preceding each of the three sections are slightly misleading – this is less a literary thriller and more firmly rooted in the crime fiction genre. The cover’s strapline, “one man’s truth is another man’s lie”, is an empty statement – probably the result of an over-enthusiastic marketing team.

Caveats aside, The Book of Mirrors engages on a number of levels. Chirovici delights in leading the reader down various blind alleys and keeps us turning the pages until his unexpected denouement.

Originally published by the TLS

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Theatre Review – Combustion

Posted by lucypopescu on June 18, 2017

Asif Khan, last seen at the Arcola performing Hassan Abdulrazzak’s one-man show Love, Bombs and Apples, has turned his hand to writing and his remarkable debut Combustion, about a small group of British Muslims and their response to Islamophobia, is a tour de force.

Set in modern-day Bradford, a group of Asian men have been imprisoned for grooming a young white girl for sex. The consequences for the girl and her family have been devastating and tensions are running high. The English Defence League is up in arms and has planned a protest march.

Shaz (Beruce Khan) owns a car repair garage, works hard and is looking forward to getting married. He tries to keep out of trouble, but business is suffering and his feisty younger sister, Samina (Shireen Farkhoy) is intent on speaking at the counter demonstration led by the Muslim community.

Nervous about the reaction of his prospective in-laws, Shaz tries to prevent Samina from continuing her activities with the local peace organisation and becomes increasingly controlling. Meanwhile, Samina finds an unlikely supporter in Andy (Nigel Hastings) a former EDL member who switches sides.

In Nona Shepphard’s fast paced production, Shaz’s two mechanics provide much of the humour. Cocksure Ali (Rez Kempton) has his eye on Samina while Faisal (Mitesh Soni) yearns for someone kind to marry and thinks he’d be safer in Pakistan.

Khan treats his sensitive subject with both humour and intelligence. His nuanced characters and clever plot twists keep us guessing to the end and the play’s dark denouement is truly shocking. Smart and topical, Combustion is a must see during these troubled times.

Arcola Theatre

Running until 24 June                                 

Box Office: 020 7503 1646

Originally published by Camden New Journal

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Film Review – Lost in Lebanon

Posted by lucypopescu on May 28, 2017

 

This heart breaking film  by Sophia and Georgia Scott follows four Syrian refugees as they struggle to rebuild their lives in Lebanon. Syria’s neighbour has had to cope with a massive influx of refugees – Lebanon’s population is 4.4 million and 1.5 million Syrians have flooded into the country since the beginning of the conflict. Lost in Lebanon was shot in Beirut and on the Syrian border between 2014 and 2016. During this time, Lebanon was forced to restrict its open door policy for Syrian refugees and imposed various visa restrictions aimed at discouraging Syrians from entering or staying. As the film makes clear, the result has been devastating for many refugees who have nowhere else to go and fear for their lives if they are forcibly returned to Syria.

Sheikh Abdo manages a refugee camp just five kilometres from the Syrian border. Abdo takes his responsibilities seriously and works tirelessly for his fellow refugees. Nemr is a 19-year-old high-school student who fled forced military recruitment: “My destiny would have been to become a killer or a victim.” He volunteers in the camp’s school but dreams of a better future. Reem is a former architect who now helps in the Shatila refugee camp in Beirut. As a refugee she is not supposed to work but spends her time trying to help those worse off than herself. Mwafak is a 26-year-old artist, also based in Beirut. Mwafak never stops giggling, but then we realise his humour is a defence mechanism, a means of survival, he is laughing at his own plight. He is proud; not wanting to be labelled a refugee he refuses to register with the UNRHC until he is forced to. Mwafak is driven by his imagination, his need to create art, and his talent. He also volunteers, teaching art to children in another refugee camp.

All four show similar commitment to the health and education of Syrian children, however rudimentary. They recognise the importance of educating the next generation and that their homeland will need to be rebuilt with love and creativity rather than hate and violence. They exhibit extraordinary resilience in the face of unimaginable hardship but the relentless fear of deportation impacts on them all with devastating consequences. Both Nemr and Mwafak consider attempting the perilous journey by sea. Nemr ponders why anyone would want to risk their lives and concludes “they’re willing to drown just to live as humans.” Lost in Lebanon contains many such shocking soundbites. At a meeting organised by Reem, one man remarks on the hell they find themselves in: “We can’t go back to Syria, we can’t renew our residency, we can’t leave by boat. Why don’t they just exterminate us and be done with it.”

If you have ever wondered what life is like for a refugee then see this film. No one should have to endure this degree of psychological torture and the West needs to demonstrate compassion rather than prejudice or indifference. Sophia Scott’s beautiful cinematography opens in a long dark tunnel with blinding light at the end and the joyous sound of children playing, calling out the name of their homeland; it ends in the same tunnel but the camera is travelling in the opposite direction with the light receding. Birds also feature; just as they are free to travel over land and sea, refugees are not. The refusal of these men, women and children to give up offers a ray of hope. A remarkable and humane film that never strikes a false note.

Originally published by Cine-vue.com

 

 

 

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Theatre review – The Plague

Posted by lucypopescu on April 22, 2017

 

The Plague After La Peste by Albert Camus

Adapted and directed by Neil Bartlett

Arcola Theatre, Running until 6 May

Box Office: 020 7503 1646

 

Albert Camus’s 1947 novel describes the effects of a plague in the French Algerian city of Oran. Some claim La Peste was inspired by the cholera epidemic that ravaged Oran in 1849, others thought it was about the Nazi occupation during World War II. This ambivalence is part of the story’s power and one that Neil Bartlett fully recognises in his engaging, multi-layered production.

Played out on a largely bare stage, Bartlett’s adaptation opens with five characters sitting behind a table at some sort of official enquiry. They begin to share their experiences. The first sign of the impending catastrophe is the discovery of rats’ corpses. Then people start to die and the authorities fail to take decisive action.

Dr Rieux (Sara Powell) works tirelessly to save lives but there are other, less scrupulous characters. Rambert (Billy Postlethwaite) is a journalist more interested in escaping the city’s lockdown to be reunited with his girlfriend than reporting the truth while Mr Cottard (Joe Alessi), a petty criminal, tries to turn events to his advantage and make money smuggling desperate people out of the city.

I was reminded of the HiNi pandemic, the Ebola outbreak and the current refugee crisis. What Bartlett draws out are the human responses to tragedy – some kind, others cruel, or self-serving. But as Dr Rieux remarks, the most merciful act is “to speak up and bear witness; to make sure that there is at least some memory of the injustices and violences that are done to people…” It’s a poignant piece of theatre with particular relevance to our troubled times.

 

Originally published by Camden Review

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Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award Shortlist 2017

Posted by lucypopescu on April 13, 2017

The Authors’ Club is pleased to announce that the shortlist for the annual Best First Novel Award is as follows:

GUINEVERE GLASFURD, The Words In My Hand (Two Roads)

The judges commented: It’s a lovely book, taking the genre of historical fiction to a new level and it rings true.  There is a strong faithfulness to the known facts, coupled with a wonderfully sensitive imagination and a total lack of sentimentality.  

 ROWAN HISAYO BUCHANAN, Harmless Like You (Sceptre)

The judges commented: A vividly written story about a young Japanese woman who, comes of age in New York. An ambitious account of the search for identity and the need to belong in some way. The nuances of cultural differences are fascinating.

 JESS KIDD, Himself (Canongate)

The judges commented: An original and unusual book set in a remote village in the west of Ireland. A terrific murder mystery, Jess Kidd is a fabulous writer, and I’m sure we’ll hear much more of her. 

BARNEY NORRIS, Five Rivers Met on a Wooded Plain (Penguin)

The judges commented: It is a beautifully moving, thought-provoking creation… There is an underlying sense of sadness, loneliness, regret and uncertainty as the lives of five people become tenderly and unknowingly intertwined.

HARRY PARKER, Anatomy of a Soldier (Faber)

The judges commented: A gripping work, terse, perceptive and profound. The reality of life in a modern war zone is presented with astonishing detail and focus. An unforgettable and powerful read.

FRANCIS SPUFFORD, Golden Hill (Faber)

The judges commented: Spufford’s writing is of the highest literary order. The plot is intricate beyond the dreams of Machiavelli and the prose flows with unwavering assurance, arresting imagery and much vivid detail.

Lucy Popescu (chair of the judging panel) commented: “This year, we had a very strong longlist, producing a passionate debate, but we managed to whittle down the list to six books. I’m relieved we have Roma Tearne, this year’s guest adjudicator, to decide our overall winner.”

The prize is open to any debut novel written in English and published in the UK between 1 Jan and 31 Dec 2016 with one important exception: novels first published in another country of origin will not be considered. The prize of £2500 exists to support UK-based authors, publishers and agents, so the novel must originate in the UK and not have been published anywhere else in the world before its UK publication  Inaugurated in 1954, the Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award is now in its 64th year, making it the longest-running UK prize for debut fiction and – except for the James Tait Black and the Hawthornden – the oldest literary prize in Britain.

Past winners have included Brian Moore, Alan Sillitoe, Paul Bailey, Gilbert Adair, Nadeem Aslam, Diran Adebayo, Jackie Kay, Susan Fletcher, Nicola Monaghan, Laura Beatty, Anthony Quinn, Jonathan Kemp, Kevin Barry, Ros Barber and Carys Bray. Last year’s prize was awarded to Benjamin Johncock.

The winning novel is selected by guest adjudicator Roma Tearne from a shortlist drawn up by a panel of Authors’ Club members, chaired by Lucy Popescu.

Past adjudicators have included Vikram Seth, Philip Hensher, Joanne Harris, Deborah Moggach and, going back further, Kingsley Amis and Compton Mackenzie.

Key Dates

Shortlisted authors event at Waterstones Piccadilly: Thursday 25 May

The Winner will be announced by Roma Tearne, this year’s guest adjudicator at a dinner at the National Liberal Club: Thursday 8 June 

 

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Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award

Posted by lucypopescu on April 10, 2017

Best First Novel Award Longlist 2017

The Authors Club is pleased to announce that the longlist for the Best First Novel Award 2017 award is as follows:

ALYS CONRAN, Pigeon (Parthian Books)
GUINEVERE GLASFURD, The Words In My Hand (Two Roads)
ROWAN HISAYO BUCHANAN, Harmless Like You(Sceptre)
CHARLOTTE HOBSON, The Vanishing Futurist(Faber)
JESS KIDD, Himself (Canongate)
JEM LESTER, Shtum (Orion)
BARNEY NORRIS, Five Rivers Met on a Wooded Plain (Penguin)
GRAHAM NORTON, Holding (Hodder)
HARRY PARKER, Anatomy of a Soldier (Faber)
FRANCIS SPUFFORD, Golden Hill (Faber)
RADHIKA SWARUP, Where the River Parts (Sandstone)
ELEANOR WASSERBERG, Foxlowe (4th Estate)

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Film Review – I Am Not Your Negro

Posted by lucypopescu on April 10, 2017

 

 

Raoul Peck’s provocative and timely documentary, I Am Not Your Negro, is an incisive meditation on America’s black civil rights movement told through the eyes of the late novelist James Baldwin. Peck’s Oscar-nominated film focuses on Baldwin’s unfinished manuscript, Remember This House, about the lives and murders of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and Medgar Evers. Baldwin, who was remarkably fortune to escape assassination himself, was friends with all three and their deaths were to have a profound effect on his life and work.

Interspersed with Baldwin’s reflections, narrated by Samuel L Jackson, is footage of various civil rights demonstrations from the 50s and 60s, together with recordings of Baldwin’s lectures, debates and TV appearances. He is an arresting, articulate figure with an incredible ability to summarise racial and cultural politics. “The story of the Negro in America is the story of America,” Baldwin once remarked. Peck underlines the continuing truth of this statement by juxtaposing past brutality – against civil-rights protesters in Birmingham and Selma in the 1960s – with more recent racism such as the violent assault of Rodney King by Los Angeles police filmed by a bystander in 1991. As Peck demonstrates, appalling inequality and racist attitudes prevail today.

In one essay, Baldwin described how mainstream cinema has helped fuel race divisions by presenting the differences between good and evil in black and white terms. Peck bring this vividly to life with scenes from popular American films dating from the 1930s. John Wayne’s cowboys, for example, were always on the side of right, and the native Indians were always the baddies – leaving the spectator to presume that they deserved to be massacred. In the 50s, blond bombshell Doris Day exemplified the perfect American wife while in early Hollywood films, black actors only featured as lackeys and servents serving to consolidate specific racial imagery.

Although past and current race relations are starkly drawn, Peck’s film never feels bleak. This is mainly due to Baldwin’s charismatic screen presence, his passion for reasoned argument and the power of his rhetoric.  As he claimed in one television interview: “I can’t be a pessimist because I’m alive. To be a pessimist means that you have agreed that human life is an academic matter, so I’m forced to be an optimist. I’m forced to believe that we can survive whatever we must survive.”  It’s this resolute defiance that sets the tone for Peck’s film. Baldwin died in 1987 but I Am Not Your Negro serves to resurrect his indomitable spirit as well as introducing this great writer and social critic to new audiences.

Originally published by Cine-Vue.com

 

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Film review – A Quiet Passion

Posted by lucypopescu on April 10, 2017

 

Terence Davies is no stranger to biographical film, having mined his own life story to great effect in Distant Voices, Still Lives and The Long Day Closes.  The overall tone of his sensitive Emily Dickenson biopic mirrors the great American poet’s contemplative style. The languorous pace may divide audiences, despite some strong performances and memorable camerawork.

A Quite Passion, starring Cynthia Nixon, opens in 1848 with Dickinson’s family rescuing her from the evangelical Mount Holyoke Female Seminary. She had been considered something of an outsider and was chastised for her lack of religious conviction – something she wrestled with for many years. Dickinson returns to her Amherst home with her beloved family, and there she remains for the rest of her life and the film’s duration.

Dickinson never ventured far from her Massachusetts home, apparently she never found a reason to leave, and so Davies focuses on her relationship with her family – the occasional power struggles with her stern father (Keith Carradine), her love for her supportive sister Lavinia (Jennifer Ehle), affection for her brother Austin (Duncan Duff), and despondency over her ailing, bedbound mother Emily (Joanna Bacon) as well as an ardent friendship with the feisty Vryling Wilder Buffum (Catherine Bailey).

Dickinson has to ask the permission of her father in order to write poetry and letters during the night and she proves a prolific correspondent. However, most of her letters were destroyed after her death and only a few poems were published in her life time. She never married and, considering herself unattractive, became increasingly reclusive and embittered in her final years. She died young, aged just fifty-five, never suspecting that she was to become one of American’s best known and loved poets. Davies matches Dickinson’s reflective nature with some ponderous takes – especially when the family are in the drawing room reading or crocheting. He admirably succeeds in conveying Dickinson’s stoicism and her frequent internalisation of emotional pain but, at times, A Quiet Passion feels desperately slow.

Although the sisters find succour in their affection for one another, their observance of familial duty is oppressive. Following the strict social mores of the time, they both quietly accept their formal, cloistered existence, rather than attempting to forge a life outside. It is no surprise that Lavinia also remained a spinster.  Nixon gives a hugely sympathetic performance and portrays Dickinson’s mental and physical decline with real conviction. She stands out from her fellow actresses, some of whom appear to have graduated from the same school of acting – there are a lot of stoical smiles and eyes brimming with tears. The men’s exuberant hair, admittedly true to the period, also proves something of a distraction.

Dickinson’s life, like many of her poems, was suffused with melancholy. Davies suggests her sole infatuation was with a rather dull, married clergyman who admires her poetry. It’s only fleetingly touched upon in the film and Dickinson’s obsession appears to come out of nowhere. Similarly, Austin’s affair with Mabel Loomis Todd (Noémie Schellens), who was to posthumously publish Dickinson’s poems, is barely explored and yet it almost destroyed the siblings’ relationship. While Davies vividly captures the period’s austerity and Dickinson’s despair at being misunderstood, there are a few too many scenes of repressed emotion followed by wild outbursts of grief. A Quiet Passion would have benefited from a subtler lightening of the shadows, if only to better appreciate the darkness which was to gradually engulf the reclusive but prolific poet.

Originally published by Cine-Vue.com

 

 

 

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